Camera Obscura To Create New Generation of Photographers

 

 

Deej Gausling, digital photography instructor, sits inside her working classroom-sized camera. Like a real camera, the image is projected upside-down onto the “sensor.”

Deej Gausling, digital photography instructor, sits inside her working classroom-sized camera. Like a real camera, the image is projected upside-down onto the “sensor.”  Photo – Julia Johnson

Darick T. Earney

Associate Editor

 

This past August, Professor of Computer Graphics and Web Design, Dixie Gausling, opened up Lewis and Clark’s very first camera obscura exhibit.

Camera obscura is not an invention, but a discovery that dates as far back as the fifth century B.C., and is used now as a means of replicating the inside of a camera.

Using an empty room, Gausling created her own camera obscura with a tall white back drop, black trash bags, duct tape, and an ink pen.

The black trash bags are used to seal off any windows where light may enter, while the duct tape is used to hold the trash bags in place.

The ink pen was used to poke a tiny hole into one of the trash bags, in order to imitate the opening of a camera eye. The hole is also for sunlight to come in and reflect off of the white backdrop in order to create an inverted reflection of whatever is outside of the window.

Gausling shows that the camera obscura only works when the room is pitch black. Photo - Julia Johnson.

Gausling shows that the camera obscura only works when the room is pitch black. Photo – Julia Johnson.

Ever since Gausling saw a camera obscura done on a T.V. documentary years ago, she has wanted to bring the idea to L&C in hopes of teaching her students about the art and science of photography.

“The camera obscura displays not only the art of photography, but also the science,” Gausling, said.

Gausling teaches introductory and advanced photography classes each semester, and is hoping that camera obscura will spark new interest for students curious about taking one of the offered courses.

There are many supporters of Gausling’s camera obscura that are just as passionate as she is to now have an exhibit on campus.

“I just think it is amazing that L&C has such a passionate instructor. Dixie “Deej” Gausling worked so hard on this and it’s pretty freaking awesome to experience in person. Hands down, it is going to be one of my most remembered experiences here at L&C,“ Web Design major, Paula Hinkson said.

For more on Gausling’s camera obscura, or to visit the exhibit personally, she may be reached at dgauslin@lc.edu.

 

Contact Darick at dearney@lc.edu