A Wise Man’s Fear, The Book That Shouldn’t End

Lucas Gardner
ljgardner@lc.edu

 

In regards to my previous book review on The Name of the Wind, it was a tad slow I believe this to be because I didn’t have enough patience for ‘minor backstory’ because I wanted the backstory.

Anyway moving on, A Wise Man’s Fear was much faster paced and I had to compare the two. I didn’t want this book to end. When I was within sprinting distance of the end, I actually put the book down, bought groceries, and vacuumed the stairs. I wanted so desperately to savor those last fifty pages as I was listing to the final twenty minutes I had half a mind to just stop but I honestly I just couldn’t.

I’d say after you make it through the first book, the second one picks up and goes like a steamroller. Not fast and minuscule, but large and powerful. Every paragraph is like an adrenaline rush, at least it was for me. In my opinion, it is better than the first book. Kavothe is growing older and we see more of his development into a traditional hero.  Kavothe picks up some sweet skills as a lover and a fighter. Kavothe also progresses in his magical studies, and while he still makes mistakes and doesn’t succeed at everything, he adventures and meets interesting characters. Kavothe is also clever beyond belief.

A few of the specific details I enjoyed about this book were that Elodin cracked me up. I love his teaching antics! The Adem plotline is awesome, their whole system of communication is a nice creation. I also enjoyed the concept of watching one’s reputation enlarge and morph continues and it’s well done. I also loved the style of fighting that Adem used, it’s super interesting to read.

If you are curious about Kavothe and wanna really get into the character, I won’t spoil everything else. You should read this series, it is by far the best thing I’ve ever read as of now! It’s possible that my mind could change with more books that I read or listen to in the future. For now, if there is any book that when you read it, you feel like the whole story is poetry or at least the explanations of things, then sign me up! I’d be highly interested in reading it myself.

, , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *